Thursday, May 19, 2022

Mommy - where do airplanes go when they die?

 And you wonder why the Government is 
always broke? Holy shit... 

Aerial photographs from Arizona's aircraft boneyard show thousands of defunct airplanes laid out in meticulous rows in what may be their final resting place along the desert floor. 
German photographer Bernhard Lang captured the incredible sights at the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (309th AMARG) at an air force base in Tucson. Row after row of aircraft at the end of their lives sit waiting to rust away or be cannibalized - or perhaps to fly again. Each row is organized by model and size, including civilians airliners retired after demand for air travel plummeted because of the Covid pandemic. Nearly 4,000 aircraft are housed on the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base across 2,600 acres, making it the largest storage and preservation facility in the world.  

The military aircraft are either parked during temporary 
non-use or cannibalized and recycled. Usable components are removed and resold, raw materials are sorted and sent for recycling.

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6 comments:

  1. If you ever get a chance to see it...The Pima Air Museum is a good one and the boneyard tour is worth the money if you like old aircraft.
    A CG helo I used to work on/fly in was on display at the museum. The first time I was at the museum they had a B-17 co-pilot from the first daylight bombing raid on Berlin we Americans did there to help explain the B-17 on display.

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  2. There’s more than one A-10 I was married to sittin in pieces out there. Was kind of heartbreaking when I saw them.

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  3. So what do YOU think we should do with old wasted useless shit? Put it in the white house?

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  4. Most are not sitting there rusting. Many are in long-term storage, sealed and pumped full of nitrogen to purge moisture and inhibit corrosion, and could be put back in service. Many are a valuable source of spare parts for aircraft out of production, or where salvaged parts are less expensive, and readily available.

    https://airplaneboneyards.com/davis-monthan-afb-amarg-airplane-boneyard.htm

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  5. If I'm not mistaken, some of those aircraft are there due to the observable decommissioning requirements of various strategic arms reduction treaties.

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