It's Friday. Took long enough...

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Fanad lighthouse on a dark, dreary day.
I just returned from a vacation in Ireland. There's a road marked out called the Wild Atlantic Way that runs from the far north to the south of the country along the sea coast. It's pretty spectacular.


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If you can figure this out please explain it in a comment. I don't get it.

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You've heard about Trump's Wall and The Great Wall of China.
This is Hadrian’s Wall. You've heard of it, right? 

Hadrian's Wall (Latin: Vallum Aelium), also called the Roman Wall, Picts' Wall, or Vallum Hadriani in Latin, was a defensive fortification in the Roman province of Britannia, begun in AD 122 in the reign of the emperor Hadrian. It ran from the banks of the River Tyne near the North Sea to the Solway Firth on the Irish Sea, and was the northern limit of the Roman Empire, immediately north of which were the lands of the northern Ancient Britons, including the Picts. 

It had a stone base and a stone wall. There were milecastles with two turrets in between. There was a fort about every five Roman miles. From north to south, the wall comprised a ditch, wall, military way and vallum, another ditch with adjoining mounds. It is thought the milecastles were staffed with static garrisons, whereas the forts had fighting garrisons of infantry and cavalry. In addition to the wall's defensive military role, its gates may have been customs posts.

A significant portion of the wall still stands and can be followed on foot along the adjoining Hadrian's Wall Path. The largest Roman archaeological feature anywhere, it runs a total of 73 miles (117.5 kilometres) in northern England.Regarded as a British cultural icon, Hadrian's Wall is one of Britain's major ancient tourist attractions.[4] It was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. In comparison, the Antonine Wall, thought by some to be based on Hadrian's wall (the Gillam hypothesis), was not declared a World Heritage site until 2008.

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In New York City  some of the old school street vendors used to sell baked potatoes.
No way that would happen today. Too bad - we worry too much about stupid shit.

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This is a sample of what I do for a living. I remodel. And repair.

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Boy ain't THAT the friggin' truth...

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Where there's a will, there's a way. That is really funny.

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That's enough for today.

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In case you were wondering. That's me.








Bouncing and bumping along merrily...

VOLUME TWENTY or there abouts... (A couple of these are courtesy of Kenny Lane at http://knuckledraggin.com/ check out his b...

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